Open Enrollment

Published by Ms.Richards on August 16th, 2011

We have openings in our Toddler, Primary and Elementary Programs. The Toddler Program is for 18 months+ and the Primary Program is for ages 3-6 yrs. The Elementary Program is open for grades 1st-6th. Please call now to make an appointment for a visit! Phone: 310-328-6313 or email: info@childrensplaceschool.com


Encourage

Published by Ms.Richards on August 16th, 2011

Encouraging a child’s inherent joy of learning and discovery.


Creating Admiration and Wonder

Published by Ms.Richards on August 16th, 2011

“If the idea of the universe is
presented to the child in the
right way, it will do more for them
than just arouse their interest.
It will create in them admiration
and wonder, a feeling loftier
than any interest and more
satisfying”.
~ Dr. Maria Montessori


Elementary Program

Published by Ms.Richards on August 16th, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

Our Elementary class works together on projects and presentation that span the curriculum.  Children regularly report on what they’ve learned to their classmates.  They have frequent opportunities to speak before the group, teach others, and learn from their peers.

For more information about our Elementary Program please see the pull-down under “Our Programs”


Toddler/Primary Program

Published by Ms.Richards on August 16th, 2011


Elementary Summer Show

Published by Ms.Richards on August 16th, 2011

Don’t miss our Elementary Summer Show “Mr. Fiddleybump’s Museum of Everything”, an original production of TCP Montessori, this Friday, August 19, 2011 at 7pm. The show is at the Primary Campus (1215 Crenshaw Blvd.) we’ll be having an informal dessert potluck afterward.


Dr. Maria Montessori

Published by Ms.Richards on August 16th, 2011

“Education between the ages of six and twelve is not a direct continuation of that which has gone before, although it is built upon that foundation.

Psychologically there is a decided change in personality (within the child), and we recognize that nature has made this a period for the acquisition of culture, just as the former was for the absorption of environment.

We are confronted with a considerable development of consciousness … and there is an unusual demand on the part of the child to know the reason (why things work or why things are the way they are).

The secret of good teaching is to regard the child’s intelligence as a fertile field in which seeds may be sown, to grow under the heat of flaming imagination. Our aim is not only to make the child understand, and still less to force him to memorize, but so to touch his imagination as to enthuse him to his innermost core.

We do not want complacent pupils but eager ones. We seek to sow life in the child rather than theories, to help her in her growth, mental and emotional as well as physical and for that we must offer grand and lofty ideas to the human mind.

If the idea of the universe is presented to the child in the right way, it will do more for him than just arouse his interest. It will create in him admiration and wonder, a feeling loftier than any interest and more satisfying.

But if neglected during this period, or frustrated in its vital needs, the mind of the child becomes artificially dulled, and henceforth will resist imported knowledge.

Interest will no longer be present if the seeds of learning are sown too late, but at six, children receive all items of culture enthusiastically. As the child grows older, these seeds will expand and grow. How many seeds should we sow? My answer is: ‘As many as possible!’”

~ Dr. Maria Montessori  


The Montessori Method

Published by Ms.Richards on August 15th, 2011

When you walk into a Montessori classroom, whether a toddler, preschool or elementary room you will notice it looks different. Often the teacher will be off to the side or working with just a few children. The adult, in Montessori, is not the center of attention, directing all the activities. Rather each child is pursuing his/her own interests from the carefully pre-selected materials available. It is not rigid and it’s not a free-for-all. The children are busy, engaged and developing the kind of inner confidence and self-discipline that aids them for life. The teacher is a keen observer of each child and offers lessons and guidance when needed. The children in a Montessori classroom seem to love what they are doing, they are lively and self-possessed and display a sense of concern and sharing with their classmates. We often have parents tell us they wish they could have attended a Montessori school!